MOXIBUSTION

Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese medicine technique...

…that involves the burning of mugwort, a small, spongy herb, to facilitate healing. Moxibustion has been used throughout Asia for thousands of years; in fact, the actual Chinese character for acupuncture, translated literally, means “acupuncture-moxibustion.” The purpose of moxibustion, as with most forms of traditional Chinese medicine, is to strengthen the blood, stimulate the flow of qi, and maintain general health

Indirect moxibustion is currently the more popular form of care because there is a much lower risk of pain or burning. In indirect moxibustion, a practitioner lights one end of a moxa stick, roughly the shape and size of a cigar, and holds it close to the area being treated for several minutes until the area turns red.

Burning Moxa has a distinct aroma which many people find very relaxing. The essential oils in Mugwort have a significant effect as a form of aromatherapy or medicinal incense. For centuries Mugwort has been used by healers and shamans to dispel evil. In European folk tradition Mugwort was placed into dream pillows to help prevent bad dreams and ward off nefarious spirits.

Moxa increases the production of red blood cells and haemoglobin. Clinical research validates that subjects who had an average haemoglobin ratio of 78% just before direct Moxibustion show a steady increase in haemoglobin production reaching a peak of 90% in eight weeks.

Moxa improves the overall blood and lymph circulations and the capacity to produce antibodies. Due to rather intense heat of burning Moxa over acu-points, impulses from nerve endings of the skin cause the dilation of capillaries (small vessels) to increase the blood and lymph circulations in the entire body. It is often the case that the patient feels warm, relaxed and sleepy from this effect after Moxibustion treatment. People who suffer from constant circulation or cold feeling in the hands and feet can greatly benefit from Moxibustion